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We’re Hiring!

Mobile Store Sales Associate At FarmVet, our mission is to help your horse achieve and maintain optimum health while offering you the best customer service at the lowest price possible. Are you self-motivated, independent and hard-working? Do you have a talent for connecting with people? Does opportunity to gain sales and marketing experience in the

We’re Hiring!

Wellington, FL – Store Manager At FarmVet, our mission is to help your horse achieve and maintain optimum health while offering you the best customer service at the lowest price possible. Are you self-motivated, independent and hard-working? Do you have a talent for connecting with people? Does an equestrian themed career with the opportunity to

We’re Hiring!

California – Mobile Store Manager At FarmVet, our mission is to help your horse achieve and maintain optimum health while offering you the best customer service at the lowest price possible. Are you self-motivated, independent and hard-working? Do you have a talent for connecting with people? Does an equestrian themed career with the opportunity to

We’re Hiring!

Mobile Store Sales Associate

At FarmVet, our mission is to help your horse achieve and maintain optimum health while offering you the best customer service at the lowest price possible.

Are you self-motivated, independent and hard-working? Do you have a talent for connecting with people? Does opportunity to gain sales and marketing experience in the equestrian industry sound like something that interests you? If so, our Mobile Store Sales Associate position may be for you!

The Mobile Store Sales Associate will work closely with our Mobile Store Team to execute and implement mobile store functions and daily activities. The ideal candidate has an equestrian background with some sales or retail experience. This is a great opportunity for recent grads!

Job Details

  • Retail Sales
  • Mobile Store Setup and Teardown
  • Build and Maintain Relationships with new and existing customers
  • Maintain mobile store inventory and reduce shrink
  • Cash Handling and Reconciliation
  • Other Special Projects

Qualifications:

  • Knowledge of the equine industry
  • Be able to lift 50lbs
  • Basic computer skills are a must
  • Must be self-motivated and hard working

A Big Plus…

  • Hunter / Jumper, Dressage, Race or Polo experience
  • Recent graduates or working students strongly encouraged to apply

Interested?

E-mail your resume and a cover letter letting us know why you would make a great addition to the FarmVet team to wgibson@farmvet.com.

Immediate hiring for Winter 2013/2014 in Ocala, FL, Wellington, FL and Southern California. 

    

FarmVet Logo

About FarmVet

FarmVet was founded in 2000 by Christian Currey. FarmVet is based in Franklin, Tennessee and has a fleet of mobile stores which travel to some of the largest horse shows in the United States. In 2013, FarmVet is opening its first retail store location in Wellington, Florida. FarmVet carries a wide selection of supplements, supplies and pharmaceuticals for both equine and pet. FarmVet also has the ability to compound drugs to meet the specific needs of the equine athlete. FarmVet is proud to currently sponsor the United States Hunter Jumper Association, Arabian Horse Association, and Equine Aid Foundation. FarmVet also sponsors well known riders such as Joe Fargis, Buck Davidson, Betsy Steiner, Clint Allen and more!

We’re Hiring!

Wellington, FL – Store Manager

At FarmVet, our mission is to help your horse achieve and maintain optimum health while offering you the best customer service at the lowest price possible.

Are you self-motivated, independent and hard-working? Do you have a talent for connecting with people? Does an equestrian themed career with the opportunity to make connections with the major players in Palm Beach County sound like something that interests you? If so, our Wellington Store Manager position may be for you!

The Wellington Store Manager will work closely with our Management Team to execute and implement retail store and warehouse functions and daily activities. The ideal candidate is a salesperson with an equestrian background and connections in the Wellington equestrian community.

Job Details

  • Retail Sales
  • Shipping & Receiving
  • Store Merchandising
  • Build and Maintain Relationships with new and existing customers
  • Delegation of store activities
  • Maintain store inventory and reduce shrink
  • Cash Handling and Reconciliation
  • Other Special Projects

Qualifications:

  • Knowledge of the equine industry
  • Be able to lift 50lbs
  • Basic computer skills are a must
  • Strong knowledge of common retail processes and functions, including cycle counts and inventory tracking
  • Working knowledge of Microsoft Office Suite, including Excel and Outlook
  • Must be self-motivated and hard working

A Big Plus…

  • Hunter / Jumper, Dressage or Polo experience
  • NetSuite or RetailPro Software knowledge
  • Vet Techs, Barn Managers, Equine Science majors, and Tack or Feed Store Associates strongly encouraged to apply

Interested?

E-mail your resume and a cover letter letting us know why you would make a great addition to the FarmVet team to wgibson@farmvet.com.

South Florida residents only. Relocation not available for this position.
    

FarmVet Logo

About FarmVet

FarmVet was founded in 2000 by Christian Currey. FarmVet is based in Franklin, Tennessee and has a fleet of mobile stores which travel to some of the largest horse shows in the United States. In 2013, FarmVet is opening its first retail store location in Wellington, Florida. FarmVet carries a wide selection of supplements, supplies and pharmaceuticals for both equine and pet. FarmVet also has the ability to compound drugs to meet the specific needs of the equine athlete. FarmVet is proud to currently sponsor the United States Hunter Jumper Association, Arabian Horse Association, and Equine Aid Foundation. FarmVet also sponsors well known riders such as Joe Fargis, Buck Davidson, Betsy Steiner, Clint Allen and more!

We’re Hiring!

California – Mobile Store Manager

At FarmVet, our mission is to help your horse achieve and maintain optimum health while offering you the best customer service at the lowest price possible.

Are you self-motivated, independent and hard-working? Do you have a talent for connecting with people? Does an equestrian themed career with the opportunity to see the best horse show venues in the country sound like something that interests you? If so, the California Mobile Store Manager position may be for you!

The California Mobile Store Manager will work closely with the Trailer Manager and Sales Manager to execute and implement mobile store functions and daily activities. The ideal candidate is a salesperson with an equestrian background and ability to travel.

Job Details

  • Retail Sales
  • Mobile Store Setup and Teardown
  • Build and Maintain Relationships with new and existing customers
  • Delegation and sorting of mobile store activities
  • Maintain mobile store inventory and reduce shrink
  • Travel across the USA with the majority of assignments in Southern California.
  • Cash Handling and Reconciliation
  • Assist in Employee Development and Hiring Process
  • Other Special Projects

Qualifications:

  • Knowledge of the equine industry
  • Be able to lift 50lbs
  • Basic computer skills are a must
  • Strong knowledge of common retail processes and functions, including cycle counts and inventory tracking
  • Working knowledge of Microsoft Office Suite, including Excel and Outlook
  • Must be a team player, who is self-motivated and hard working

A Big Plus…

  • Hunter / Jumper experience
  • Bilingual in English and Spanish
  • NetSuite or RetailPro Software knowledge
  • Vet Techs, Barn Managers, Equine Science majors, Grooms and Working Students strongly encouraged to apply

Interested?

E-mail your resume and a cover letter letting us know why you would make a great addition to the FarmVet team to wgibson [at] farmvet [dot] com.

Southern California residents only. Relocation not available for this position.

 
FarmVet Logo    About FarmVet

FarmVet was founded in 2000 by Christian Currey. FarmVet is based in Franklin, Tennessee and has a fleet of mobile stores which travel to some of the largest horse shows in the United States. FarmVet carries a wide selection of supplements, supplies and pharmaceuticals for both equine and pet. FarmVet also has the ability to compound drugs to meet the specific needs of the equine athlete. FarmVet is proud to currently sponsor the United States Hunter Jumper Association, Arabian Horse Association, and Equine Aid Foundation. FarmVet also sponsors well known riders such as Will Simpson, Leslie Morse, Joe Fargis, Buck Davidson, Betsy Steiner, Clint Allen and more!

700,000-Year-Old Horse’s DNA Sequenced

By Christa Lesté-Lasserre | thehorse.com

When it comes to mapping equine genomes, it seems researchers like old horses.

In 2007 it was the old gray Thoroughbred mare Twilight from New York. Then in 2012 it was 18-year-old Sugar, a Quarter Horse mare from Texas.

Now in 2013 it’s Thistle Creek, a Middle Pleistocene stallion from the Yukon permafrost near the eastern Alaskan border. He’s roughly 700,000 years old. That makes Thistle Creek—posthumously named for the excavation site where his leg bone fragment was discovered—the oldest equine to have its DNA fully sequenced.

And actually, Thistle Creek’s DNA is the oldest DNA of any species to be fully sequenced. The second oldest? 110,000-year-old polar bear DNA.

Ludovic Orlando, PhD, HDR, associate professor in the Centre for GeoGenetics Paleomix Group at the University of Copenhagen’s Natural History Museum of Denmark, led an international team of 56 scientists listed as co-authors of the groundbreaking study.

Sequencing such old equid DNA was like “working a jigsaw puzzle,” Orlando said, as millenniums of damage resulted in sequences no longer being on the same place on the genome map as the modern horse. Still, with patience and dedication, the team worked out the 2.4-billion-piece puzzle.

“We’ve been working on the technology to be able to do this for the past three years, and we realized that we just weren’t pushing the right buttons to fully use the tools we have that would allow us to succeed in mapping such an ancient genome,” Orlando said.

Orlando’s “buttons” included what is known as “third generation sequencing,” a novel technique that allows researchers to sequences genes “on the fly,” he said, without having to go through the delicate and possibly inaccurate process of trying to amplify damaged DNA. “We expected this to drastically improve our sensitivity, and we were right,” Orlando said.

While this finding is exciting for genome scientists throughout the world, it’s also particularly interesting for equine research. By sequencing this one horse, Orlando and colleagues have been able to compare data with that of domestic horses—including Twilight and Sugar—of varying breeds as well as the partial sequencing of a 43,000-year-old horse. By looking at the number of mutations occurring over the years in these horses, the scientists were able to calculate—with surprising confidence—approximate dates of the history of the horse.

Notably, the common ancestor of the horse, donkey, and zebra roamed modern-day North America four million years ago, according to the research team. That’s about twice as long ago as paleontologists had thought, Orlando said. They could also see that the Przewalski’s horse diverged from the line that became domestic horses about 50,000 years ago. They even detected numerous changes in horse population at different times throughout prehistory, specifically due to severe climate changes.

“We were amazed to discover that there were three major periods of expansion in the horse population, which were always followed right after by a drastic decline in the demographic of the horse,” said Orlando. “The most recent was around 25,000 years ago. That trend stopped at the start of a warm climactic period that we are still experiencing today, so the horses did not get enough resources to keep on expanding.” The other two periods occurred 200,000 and 1.2 billion years ago, he added.

Thistle Creek was probably around 14.2 to 15 hands, or about the size of a modern-day Arabian or Icelandic horse, Orlando said. Between 700,000 and 50,000 years ago the horse evolved to become smaller. Domestication and breeding programs then led the horse to its now wide range of sizes, he said.
By contrast, the common ancestor of all modern equids was probably what paleontologists identified as not even a member of the Equus genus at all, Orlando said. This genus no longer exists, but its lines led to the horse, donkey, and zebra, he said.

Orlando’s research also confirms what scientists have declared for years: The equid originated in the Americas but was then driven to extinction about 12,000 years ago. Horses returned to the Americas on European ships after Christopher Columbus’ famous 1492 journey, he said.

“This research opens up hundreds of doors and possibilities of working with DNA samples that until now have been considered too old,” Orlando concluded.

The study, “Recalibrating Equus evolution using the genome sequence of an early Middle Pleistocene horse,” will appear in an upcoming issue of Nature.

Colonels Smoking Gun

The National Reining Horse Association $5 million sire fondly known as “Gunner” was euthanized July 8.

 

By Cheryl Cody: Pro Management, Inc. July 9, 2013

Gunner 1993-2013

At McQuay Stables in Tioga, Texas, the focus has long been on exceptional performance – both human and equine. But people close to owners Tim and Colleen McQuay know that underlying all the awards and accolades the couple’s real focus has always been the love of the horse.

So, losing any horse would be hard. But saying goodbye to a great one pushed the difficulty to another level when Colonels Smoking Gun, known worldwide simply as “Gunner,” lost his battle with laminitis on July 8. The National Reining Horse Hall of Fame inductee and NRHA $5 million sire was humanely put down after spending the last week at Equine Medical Associates in Pilot Point, Texas, under the constant care of Dr. John McCarroll.

Simply, Gunner was a horse for the ages. When he made his center-stage debut at the NRHA Futurity in 1998, the reining world fell in love with the diminutive sorrel with the floppy ears and white tail. After tying for the NRHA Futurity open reserve title as a 3-year-old, he went on win the US Equestrian Team reining championship in 2001. He was immortalized as a Breyer Horse and finished his career with earnings over $177,000.

The McQuays have owned Gunner since 2005, and in those ensuing years, his record as a sire elevated him to legendary status. His outstanding offspring include 2009 NRHA Futurity and 2010 Derby open champion, Gunnatrashya. Gunner has sired numerous Futurity and Derby finalists and champions, in both the open and non-pro divisions, including 2012 NRHA Futurity open champion, Americasnextgunmodel; 2012 NRHA Futurity open reserve champion, Gunners Tinseltown; and 2012 NRHA Futurity non-pro co-champion, Customized Gunner. Gunner has also sired Gunners Special Nite, winner of the individual gold medal at the 2010 World Equestrian Games.

Attendees at the 2013 NRHA Derby who watched Jordan Larson ride HF Mobster (Gunner-Dun Its Black Gold) to the cpen championship and Mandy McCutcheon ride Always Gotyer Gunsup (Gunner-Always A Dunit) to the non-pro championship had no knowledge that the great stallion had already begun to suffer from the first signs of laminitis.

As the word spread of Gunner’s demise, his owners immediately began to receive texts and calls from all over the globe, further evidence of the great stallion’s popularity and impact. Tim McQuay noted, “We appreciate everyone who supported Gunner through his career – he had a great team. He will be laid to rest next to Hollywood Dun It on our farm. We will truly miss him.”

Colleen McQuay added, “Gunner was a sweet happy horse, and when I look at all he has given us I can only be grateful for the time we shared with him. Losing him leaves another hole in our hearts.”

To leave a message visit the McQuay Stables Facebook page. For information on McQuay Stables, visit www.mcquaystables.com.

Clinical Study on U-7, All Natural Gastric Formula.

Drugs or antacids? That’s what we usually have to choose from when our horse has ulcers. Not anymore. Now there is a natural product that has been clinically studied by one of the most prominent equine ulcer specialists in America―and the results are impressive!

Dr. Scott McClure, DVM, PhD, DACVS http://vetmed.iastate.edu/users/mcclures was the scientist who did important research on omeprazole (Gastroguard, Ulcerguard) and its effect on equine ulcers.

Now, Dr. McClure has used the same protocols: randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled―good science―to clinically study U-7 Gastric Aid and the results were surprising to many.



You can read the study here:

http://www.finishlinehorse.com/testimonials/disclaimer/

 

FACTS:___________________________________________________

Omeprazole is a proton pump inhibitor, a drug that blocks acid production in the stomach. However, it also blocks calcium uptake.

Antacids, those products containing calcium, magnesium and aluminum work by neutralizing acid that is already in the horse’s stomach. However, PH sensors in the horse recognize the drop in acid and increase production. This is called acid rebound.
_________________________________________________________

U-7 contains many ingredients that promote healthy tissues in the stomach and the hind gut. Giving U-7 Gastric Aid to your horse is easy and pleasant for the horse. Whether it is top-dressed or given orally with a syringe, horses find the botanical flavor to be extremely palatable and will even come to the front of the stall nickering and suck it out of the syringe. Horses know the good stuff.

The manufacturer makes U-7 Gastric Aid in the USA and guarantees the product to your satisfaction or your money back.

 

Physiological Changes in Horses During Warm-Up Before Exercise

By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · May 2, 2013

 

Warm-up before exercise is believed to improve performance and help prevent injury. Various warm-up methods are used for competitive horses, but few studies have examined the actual benefit of warm-up. An experiment conducted at the University of Kentucky examined physiological and metabolic effects of warm-up on Thoroughbred horses.

Four mature Thoroughbred geldings were used in the experiment. During the two months prior to the initiation of the study, horses were exercised at a trot and canter four or five times a week on a high-speed treadmill. Horses were individually housed in box stalls and were fed twice a day at 8:00 am and 4:00 p.m. except on testing days when the morning meal was withheld. At the end of the conditioning phase, the horses were assigned to treatments in a two-period cross-over design experiment. In the first period, two horses performed an 18-minute low-intensity warm-up (LW) prior to completing a step-wise exercise test and two horses performed an 18-minute moderate-intensity warm-up (MW) prior to the exercise test. In the second period, the treatments were switched.

LW consisted of 18 minutes of walk at 2 m/s on a 0% grade treadmill, and MW consisted of 5 minutes at 2 m/s on 0% grade, 4 minutes at 4 m/s (0% grade), 3 minutes at 4 m/s (10% grade), 3 minutes at 4 m/s (0% grade), and 3 minutes at 2 m/s (0% grade). Upon completion of the warm-up exercise, all horses performed a step-wise exercise test (2-7 m/s) on a 10% grade with 2-minute intervals between the steps. The exercise tests were separated by 7 days, and treatment order was balanced. The response variables were heart rate, skin and rectal temperatures, packed cell volume (PCV), plasma lactate, plasma free fatty acids (FFA), and plasma glucose.

During the 18-minute warm-up, there were time x treatment effects on heart rate, PCV, skin temperature, rectal temperature, and plasma lactate concentration, with MW producing higher values for all variables. Heart rate during the twelfth minute of the warm-up averaged 141.5 bpm when the horses performed the MW compared to 53.8 bpm when they performed the LW. Plasma FFA concentrations declined during the first 12 minutes of MW, but remained constant during the same period when horses performed the LW. MW produced higher heart rate, PCV, and skin temperatures at the initiation of the step test, but there were no differences between the treatments for these variables at the end of the step test. Plasma lactate levels at the beginning of the step-wise exercise test were not significantly different between the treatments. Plasma lactate increased during the step test, but there were no treatment effects.

During the step-wise exercise test, there was a time x treatment effect for plasma glucose. When horses completed the MW, they had lower plasma glucose concentrations at the end of the step-wise test. There was no effect of warm-up intensity on changes in FFA or TG during the step-wise exercise test. There were no effects of the warm-up intensity found on any variables during the recovery period.

Warm-up increases tissue temperature, which is believed to facilitate metabolism and muscle contraction, increase cardiac output, and dilate capillary beds in muscle. These changes increase blood flow and oxygen availability. In this study, the MW seemed to be the more ideal type of warm-up because it produced a larger temperature increase than LW, without significant lactate build-up. In addition, higher heart rate and PCV occurred during MW as expected. Despite the differences in physiological and metabolic responses during warm-up, there were no differences in heart rate or lactate responses during the step-wise exercise test. Horses in this study were not maximally exercised, so it is possible that treatment differences would have become apparent with a more difficult test. Warm-up intensity did appear to influence blood glucose responses to the step test. At the end of the exercise test, glucose level in MW became lower than in LW, while the response of plasma FFA to the step test was not affected by warm-up intensity. This was an unexpected result because the warm-up was expected to facilitate fat utilization, and thus conserve glucose. These results may indicate that the MW for this particular exercise test was not beneficial over LW.

Product Spotlight: Walsh Dog Collar and Leash


FarmVet is proud to now carry

Walsh’s Signature Dog Products.


Make your dog accessories complete with the Signature Dog Leash paired with the Signature Dog Collar.

• Luxuriously padded with soft, colored garment leather and made with Havana English Bridle Leather

• Solid Brass Hardware and fancy white stitching leave nothing to be desired

• Dog Collar has room for brass name plate

• Swivel technology in the hand hold and at the snap makes the Signature Leash far superior

 

Wellness Wednesday: “Equine Massage for Sensitive Horses” with Judith Falk


When you are working on your horse, you need to assess their physical condition. A horse with an injury may benefit from massage therapy.

Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9KRcgbBI0TY&list=PL76660C47CE9FD21E

To learn more about Judith Falk and Second Wind Equine Sports Massage, visit
Judith’s Website: www.SecondWindESM.com
Blog: www.secondwindesm.blogspot.com
and Facebook: www.facebook.com/SecondWindEquineSportsMassage/

For more information or to order Equine Health Supplies and Pharmaceuticals, please call 888.837.3626 or visit www.farmvet.com


Wellness Wednesday: What You May Not Know About Vitamin E in Horses

Horses and Hay

Vitamin E can be found naturally in roughage such as the legume alfalfa, growing pastures, and fresh grass hays. Photo credit: Unknown

 

Vitamin E is a necessary nutrient required of all animals and humans. It is often supplemented in sport horses in hard work; even in horses under maintenance care, horse owners often give it via corn or soybean oil during the winter. We use it often, but do we know why?

Cell Protection
According to Dr. Frederick Harper of the Animal Science Department at the University of Tennessee:

Vitamin E helps maintain the membrane integrity of virtually all cells in the body. Vitamin E also enhances the body’s immune response and is important in nerve and muscle function. Vitamin E interacts with the trace mineral selenium and aids maintenance of normal muscle function and helps prevent muscular disease. (Source)

Because of its anti-oxidative qualities, studies suggest that Vitamin E may prevent muscle damage in over-worked muscles due to exercise-induced stress. Studies also suggest that vitamin E in conjunction with Selenium may help alleviate the symptoms of “tying-up” or help to prevent the syndrome in  horses prone to tie-up:

For hard-working and athletic horses which may be
prone to “tying-up” there is a definite benefit from vitamin E and selenium supplementation. These antioxidants
can reduce the severity of exercise-induced free radical
damage to muscle cells. In a small percentage of horses
that tie-up, supplementation of vitamin E and selenium
alone will alleviate the problem. (Source)

Disease Prevention
Recent studies from researchers at Oregon State University and Cornell University also suggest that Vitamin E deficiencies may play a primary role in cases of equine degenerative myeloencephalopathy (EDM), equine motor  neuron disease (EMND), and equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM).

Studies suggest that low levels of vitamin E during the formative years of a horse (approx. 1 – 3 years) may largely affect the chances of the horse developing EDM. EPM, while largely treated with anti-protozoal medications, may also be aided with vitamin E supplementation as the vitamin may fortify the immune system and aid in killing the remaining parasites where antibiotics fail. As for EMND, there is currently no known cause, however EMND horses tend to have low levels of vitamin E; Cornell University is currently researching  efectiveness of vitamin E supplementation to battle the symptoms of EMND. (Source)

You can read more about the research into vitamin E and how it relates to these diseases here.

Sources
Vitamin E can be found in roughage such as green forages, growing pastures, alfalfa, and other fresh, green hays. While during the spring and in year-round moderate climates, green forage is plentiful, during times of dry drought or during the winter seasons, green forages may be harder to come by. In alfalfa and fresh, green hay, the content of Vitamin E may be heavily affected by the maturity, harvesting, and storage of these forages. Alternative sources can be found in supplementing oils such as corn and soybean oils, which are rich in Vitamin E and other anti-oxidants. (Source)

Interested in seeing what Vitamin E can do for your horse? Go to Shop.FarmVet.com, keyword, “Vitamin E”. Or just click here.


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